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CPS Earnings


These articles provide corroborative evidence of the value of the Current Population Survey data for studying the average earnings for various populations, including people with a work disability.

Burkhauser, Richard V., Mary C. Daly, and Andrew J. Houtenville.  “How Working Age People With Disabilities Fared Over the 1990s Business Cycle.” In Ensuring Health and Income Security for an Aging Workforce, Eds. Peter P. Budetti, Richard V. Burkhauser, Janice M. Gregory, and H. Allan Hunt.  Kalamazoo, Michigan:  W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, 2001, p. 291-346. 

The authors use data from the Current Population Survey and show that, despite general economic growth during the 1990s, people with disabilities experienced declining earnings and employment, in contrast to the increase for people without disability.

Daly, Mary, Richard Burkhauser, and Andrew Houtenville.  "Recent Declines in Work and Income among Men with Disabilities."  FRBSF Economic Letter, Number 2000-28, September 22, 2000.  

The authors use data from the Current Population Survey and show that the employment of men with disabilities fell during the 1990s.  In addition, despite increases in disability transfer income, the overall household income of men with disabilities fell relative to households of men without disabilities.

Gilbert, Roy F.  “Estimates of Earnings Growth Rates Based on Earnings Profiles.”  Journal of Legal Economics, 4(2), Summer 1994, 1-17. 

The author uses data from the Current Population Survey to estimate growth rates in average earnings by age for white males working year-round, full-time.  He discusses the age-earnings profile and the influence of education and experience on earnings patterns.

Hoynes, Hilary.  “The Employment, Earnings, and Income of Less Skilled Workers Over the Business Cycle.”  Paper prepared for the Conference on Labor Markets and Less Skilled Workers sponsored by the Joint Center for Poverty Research.  November 5-6, 1998.  

The author uses 1975 to 1997 data from the Current Population Survey to study the effect of business cycles on the employment and earnings of high skill and less skilled workers.  She finds that less skilled groups are more sensitive to cyclical variations than high skill groups. 

Ilg, Randy E. and Steven E. Haugen.  “Earnings and employment trends in the 1990s.”  Monthly Labor Review, March 2000, 21-33.

In this study, the authors look at the relationship between employment and earnings trends during the 1990s for high-, middle-, and low-paying job categories using data from the Current Population Survey.  They find that for these three major earnings groups, large increases in employment are not accompanied by large increases in earnings.

Meisenheimer, Joseph R., II.  “How do immigrants fare in the U.S. labor market?”  Monthly Labor Review, 115(12), December 1992, 3-19. 

The author uses data from the Current Population Survey to study the employment experience of immigrants, including median weekly earnings.  He finds that recent immigrants work less and earn less than natives and that labor market success is influenced by educational attainment and fluency in English.

U.S. Census Bureau.  "Facts for Features:  11th Anniversary of Americans With Disabilities Act (July 26)." July 2001.  

Using the Census Bureau definition of work disability used in the Current Population Survey, this press release briefly addresses the employment, earnings, and education level of those with a work disability.  

U.S. Census Bureau.  Introductory material to Current Population Reports, P23-127, Labor Force Status and Other Characteristics of Persons with a Work Disability:  1982.  Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1983, 1-8. 

This is the first Census Bureau publication reporting data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) on the employment and earnings experience of those with a work disability.  The introductory material includes average earnings figures by age, education, and disability status.

U.S. Census Bureau.  Introductory material to Current Population Reports, P23-160, Labor Force Status and Other Characteristics of Persons with a Work Disability:  1981 to 1988.  Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1989, 1-9.   

This is the second Census Bureau publication reporting employment and earnings data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) for people with a work disability.  The introductory material includes figures on the employment and earnings of the work disabled population during the 1980s.  

Yelin, Edward.  "The Labor Market and Persons with and without Disabilities:  Analysis of the 1993 through 1995 Current Population Surveys."  Paper presented for the Conference on Employment and Return to Work for People with Disabilities, sponsored by the Office of Disability, Social Security Administration, and National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (October 31 - November 1, 1996). 

The author uses data from the 1993 through 1995 Current Population Surveys to study the labor market experiences of people with and without work disability.  The paper includes a discussion of the negative effect of disability on earnings.

 

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