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Government and Nonforensic Support of Work Disability Data from the Current Population Survey


These articles provide corroborative evidence of the value of the Current Population Survey data on people with a work disability, showing some of the government and nonforensic research that has been done using the data. 

Acemoglu, Daron and Joshu D. Angrist.  “Consequences of Employment Protection?  The Case of the Americans with Disabilities Act.”  Journal of Political Economy, 2001, 109(5), 915-957. 

Using data from the Current Population Survey, the authors conclude that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) appears to have negatively affected the employment of 21- to 39-year-old people with a disability, making them less likely to be hired while not affecting their separation rate.  People without disability do not appear to have been affected by the ADA. 

Bowe, Frank.  Disabled In 1985:  A Portrait of American Adults.  Hot Springs, Arkansas:  Arkansas Research and Training Center in Vocational Rehabilitation, 1986.

The author uses data from the 1985 Current Population Survey to discuss differences between adults with and without disability in their levels of education, earnings, and employment. 

Burkhauser, Richard V., Mary C. Daly, and Andrew J. Houtenville.  “How Working Age People With Disabilities Fared Over the 1990s Business Cycle.” In Ensuring Health and Income Security for an Aging Workforce, Eds. Peter P. Budetti, Richard V. Burkhauser, Janice M. Gregory, and H. Allan Hunt.  Kalamazoo, Michigan:  W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, 2001, p. 291-346. 

The authors use data from the Current Population Survey and show that, despite general economic growth during the 1990s, people with disabilities experienced declining earnings and employment, in contrast to the increase for people without disability.

Burkhauser, Richard V., Andrew J. Houtenville, and David C. Wittenburg.  "A User Guide to Current Statistics on the Employment of People with Disabilities."  Paper presented at the Conference on the Persistence of Low Employment Rates of People With Disabilities--Cause and Policy Implications.  October 18-19, 2001.  

The authors use data from the Current Population Survey, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, and the National Health Interview Survey.  They determine that the survey data are adequate for measuring the prevalence and employment experience of people with disabilities and that, regardless of the survey or disability definition used, the employment of people with disabilities fell in the 1990s.  

Daly, Mary, Richard Burkhauser, and Andrew Houtenville.  "Recent Declines in Work and Income among Men with Disabilities."  FRBSF Economic Letter, Number 2000-28, September 22, 2000.  

The authors use data from the Current Population Survey and show that the employment of men with disabilities fell during the 1990s.  In addition, despite increases in disability transfer income, the overall household income of men with disabilities fell relative to households of men without disabilities.

Hotchkiss, Julie L.  "Growing Part-Time Employment among Workers with Disabilities: Marginalization or Opportunity.Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Economic Review, Third Quarter 2004, 25-40.

The author uses data from the Current Population Survey from 1984 through 2000 and studies the part-time employment experiences of workers with a disability.  She finds that workers with disability were more likely to be employed part-time after the implementation of the ADA, relative to their peers without disability, and that this appears to be related to financial incentives of disability policy changes during the 1990s.

Houtenville, Andrew J.  “Economics of Disability Research Report #1:  Estimates of the Prevalence of Disability in the United States by State, 1981 through 1999.”  Research funded by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, 2000. 

With data from the Current Population Survey, the author estimates the prevalence of disability among the non-institutionalized, working-age civilian population.

Andrew J. Houtenville.  "Economics of Disability Research Report #2:  Estimates of Employment Rates for Persons with Disabilities in the United States by State, 1980 through 1998."  Research funded by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, 2000. 

The author uses data from the Current Population Survey and finds that over the last 20 years, the employment rate of people with disability fell dramatically relative to those without disability.  He also studied the variance of the relative disability across states.

Houtenville, Andrew J.  “Economics of Disability Research Report #3:  Estimates of Median Household Size-Adjusted Income for Persons with Disabilities in the United States by State, 1980 through 1998.”  Research funded by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, 2000. 

With data from the Current Population Survey, the author estimates median household size-adjusted income and finds that, since 1980, the growth of the income for those with a disability has been lower than the rest of the population.

McNeil, John M.  Affidavit filed in Brian D. Rogde v. Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation, d/b/a/ Metra No. 98 C7163 (2001).

This affidavit, from a retired Special Assistant for Disability Statistics with the U.S. Census Bureau, supports use of Current Population Survey data in calculation of worklife expectancies for those with and without work disabilities.  He notes that nothing he wrote while employed by the Census Bureau was intended to disqualify the CPS data from this use.

Miller, Herman P.  Affidavit. 2001.

This affidavit is from a former chief of the Population Division of the Census Bureau.  In it, he supports use of data from the Current Population Survey for studying the employment experiences of people with a work disability.  He notes specifically that he feels The New Worklife Expectancy Tables "make appropriate and accurate use of these data."  

U.S. Census Bureau.  "Facts for Features:  11th Anniversary of Americans With Disabilities Act (July 26)." July 2001.  

Using the Census Bureau definition of work disability used in the Current Population Survey, this press release briefly addresses the employment, earnings, and education level of those with a work disability.  

U.S. Census Bureau.  Introductory material to Current Population Reports, P23-127, Labor Force Status and Other Characteristics of Persons with a Work Disability:  1982.  Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1983, 1-8. 

This is the first Census Bureau publication reporting data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) on the employment and earnings experience of those with a work disability.  The introductory material describes the survey, the definition of work disability, and the ability of the CPS to measure this population.

U.S. Census Bureau.  Introductory material to Current Population Reports, P23-160, Labor Force Status and Other Characteristics of Persons with a Work Disability:  1981 to 1988.  Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1989, 1-9.   

This is the second Census Bureau publication reporting employment and earnings data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) for people with a work disability.  The introductory material discusses the nature of work disability, the specific definition used in the CPS, and the employment and earnings of the work disabled population during the 1980s.  

Yelin, Edward.  "The Labor Market and Persons with and without Disabilities:  Analysis of the 1993 through 1995 Current Population Surveys."  Paper presented for the Conference on Employment and Return to Work for People with Disabilities, sponsored by the Office of Disability, Social Security Administration, and National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (October 31 - November 1, 1996). 

The author uses data from the 1993 through 1995 Current Population Surveys to study the labor market experiences of people with and without work disability.  Among other results, he finds that people with work disability are more likely to exit the labor force and less likely enter than are people without work disability.  In addition, people with work disability are more likely to work part-time.

Yelin, Edward H. and Patricia P. Katz.  "Labor force trends of persons with and without disabilities."  Monthly Labor Review, October 1994, 36-42.   

The authors use data from the Current Population Survey and from the National Health Interview Survey and present the employment trends for people with disability.  They studied the period from 1970 to 1992 and find that the participation rate of men with disability decreased, while the participation rate of women with disability increased as part of the increase in participation of women generally. 

Yelin, Edward and Laura Trupin.  "Successful Labor Market Transitions for Persons with Disabilities:  Factors Affecting the Probability of Entering and Maintaining Employment."  Report presented for the Conference on Employment Post the Americans with Disability Act, sponsored by the Office of Disability, Social Security Administration, and National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, November 17-18, 1997. 

The authors use data from the Current Population Survey to study the experiences of people with disability in the labor market.  They find that people with disability are much more likely to leave a job than to enter one.  They discuss factors that could affect this, such as age, occupation, industry, and numbers of hours worked. 

 

 

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