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Articles on Life, Participation and Employment (LPE) Method of Computing Worklife Expectancy


These articles deal with the Life, Participation, Employment method of calculating worklife expectancy.  This method is used by the The New Worklife Expectancy Tables; however these articles make no reference to The Tables.

Albrecht, Gary.  "Forecasting the Earnings of a Partially Disabled Individual."  Journal of Legal Economics, July 1991, 50-57.  

The author supports use of the Current Population Survey data for estimating lifetime loss of earnings for people with a work disability.  He demonstrates a calculation of lost earnings by applying these data using the Life, Participation, Employment method of calculating worklife expectancy.

Brookshire, Michael L. and William E. Cobb.  "The Life-Participation-Employment Approach to Worklife Expectancy in Personal Injury and Wrongful Death Cases."  For the Defense, July 1983, 20-25.  

This article introduces the Life, Participation, Employment method of calculating worklife expectancy.  The method adds the consideration of unemployment to the conventional method used previously by the U.S. Department Labor, making the method more appropriate for assessments of lost earning capacity.

Brookshire, Michael L., William E. Cobb, and Anthony M. Gamboa.  "Work-Life of the Partially Disabled."  Trial, March 1987.   

The authors apply Census data on people with a work disability to the Life, Participation, Employment method of calculating worklife expectancy.  This enables the calculation of worklife expectancy for people with and without work disability, essential for estimating lifetime loss of earnings for people with a partial disability.

Corcione, Frank P. and Robert J. Thornton.  "Forecasting Earnings Losses of the Disabled with the LPE Method."  Journal of Forensic Economics, Spring/Summer 1998, 115-120.  

The authors note that the Life, Participation, Employment approach for estimating worklife expectancy would be more valuable if the possibility that a person might develop a work disability in the future (or become further disabled) were considered.

Her, Monica, William Jennings, and Albert Kinderman.  “Potential Bias in the Use of Life, Participation, and Employment Approach.”  Journal of Legal Economics, Fall 2001, 19-30. 

The authors note that the Life, Participation, Employment method of estimating worklife expectancy could over- or underestimate actual worklife for given individuals.  The two main criticisms are that the method does not take specifics of the individual into account and that it does properly measure the earning capacity standard required in some states.

Jennings, William and Penelope Mercurio-Jennings.  "A Critique of the Joint Probability of Life, Participation, and Employment Approach."  Journal of Legal Economics, Spring/Summer 1998, 61-70.

The authors state their belief that data limitations result in an overestimate of lifetime loss of earnings when using the Life, Participation, Employment (LPE) approach to worklife expectancy.  They note that this limitation is based on inadequate data regarding number of hours worked, hourly earnings, and benefits for full-time and part-time workers.  They also note that use of the LPE method requires the use of a non-risk-free discount rate.

Payne, James E. and Michael J. Piette.  “Comment:  A Critique of the Joint Probability of Life, Participation, and Employment Approach.”  Journal of Legal Economics, Fall 2000, 81-84.

The authors respond to the article by Jennings and Mercurio-Jennings (1998), noting that the Life, Participation, Employment (LPE) approach is flexible and that the plaintiff’s earnings stream or individual elements of the LPE approach can be adjusted by the expert to account for possible problems with hours or earnings.  They also note that the LPE method incorporates enough major life risks that the appropriate discount rate is one that is risk-free. 

Richard, Hugh and Jon R. Abele.  Life and Worklife Expectancies.  Tucson, AZ:  Lawyers and Judges Publishing Company, Inc., 1999.  

This book describes various methods of calculating life and worklife expectancies, including the Life, Participation, Employment method used in The New Worklife Expectancy Tables.

 

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